Book Reviews

The Book Thief – Markus Zusak

I read this book over a year ago but I never got around to writing up a review. Since it’s one of my favourite books I’ve ever read, of course I’m going to recommend it to all of you in an honest review. 

First of all, I cried. Yes of course I cried. If you’ve been around for a while you’ll know I’m a very empathetic person and the slightest hint of sadness sets me off. That being said, I’m sure that 99.9% of people feel sad after reading this book, to that 0.1% of you that don’t, do you have a soul?

That leads me on perfectly to tell you about the book! The Book Thief is narrated by Death, yes you heard me right (or read that right?).. He clearly hates his job, I mean seriously, of course he’d hate collecting souls of the dead at any time but since the story is set during World War 2, his work load got a whole lot bigger! Yet despite this, Zusak has created a well-rounded, wholesome character. Death is lonely, depressed and writes in a hauntingly poetic way that encapsulates the reader. Death looks for the beauty in the world, focusing on the colours of the sky whilst collecting the souls. I find this truly beautiful, the idea that there is always something good to look for in the bad.

This book is under the category of Young Adult. Don’t get me wrong, it’s perfect for young adults who are exploring their passions and learning, but why stop there? I think it’s perfect for all ages and would recommend it to any reader of any age. When I picked this book up from my local Waterstones, the lovely lady who served me was ever so glad I decided to purchase it. She told me about her book club who had recently read the book and thoroughly enjoyed it which encouraged me to read the book immediately that evening!

I love books based around war, favourites include Private Peaceful, The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas, War Horse; books I’m sure you’ve all heard of, and there are plenty more to be found on my bookshelves. But this one had me more intrigued that just the aspect of war: the characters.

We have the wonderful Liesel Meminger, whose determination and passion is inspiring and heart warming. There is the ever sweet Hans Hubermann and his strong-minded wife Rosa Hubermann. The lemon-haired boy Rudy Steiner, and the one and only Max Vandenburg, both wonderful male characters and ever the young gentlemen.

So the title. Book Thief. Intriguing right? I love the premise of the whole novel being written around novels because.. novel-ception! The irony of Death stealing Liesel’s book and Liesel stealing books unites the characters, but the theft is never out of greed. Each book Liesel steals has a special reason behind it.

So after reading the book, I watched the film, which I often do if I read a book that has a film adaptation. We all know that book to film adaptations are often disappointing, they leave out large amounts of detail, but I was pleasantly surprised. Yes there are details left out of the film, but it a great film, I love the actors and their portrayal of the characters. So I am also recommending that you watch the film too, after reading the book of course!

I’m giving this book: 

Thank you for reading this post!

Jade Anna x


 

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17 thoughts on “The Book Thief – Markus Zusak

  1. This book is absolutely beautiful. When I first read it, I was really young (still in primary school) and I read it, loved it, cried buckets when Rudy died and then gave it back to my library and forgot what it was called. I’m glad it seems to have become more popular in the past few years, it got me to reread it. Definitely one of my favourites! xx

    Liked by 1 person

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